The Art of Boring™ was created for curious and passionate investors. We share strategies, frameworks, and insights to help readers and listeners make better investment decisions. Our aim? To provide some bottom-up, long-term investing signal to cut through the short-term noise.


  • Lesson of 1909

    Last week was a productive one for diplomats. Not only did the U.S. and China sign a landmark climate change accord, the two mega-powers also established military guidelines to govern the contested waters off China and agreed to reduce technology tariffs.

    November 19, 2014

  • Looking beyond borders: Why Europe isn't dead

    I recently had a discussion with a client that had just returned from a European vacation. He shared stories about the interesting food, culture, and architecture. But he also offered a warning… “The economy in Europe is dead.”

    October 30, 2014

  • Frogs in the pot

    A few weeks ago I attended a lunch with Jean-Claude Trichet. As one might expect from the former head of the European Central Bank, Trichet spoke at length on the economy, quantitative easing and monetary policy. However, what was pleasantly surprising was his candour.

    October 10, 2014


  • Worrying signals for Russia’s economy

    Two important events involving Russia occurred in the last week. First, Russia amassed a highly suspicious buildup of 20,000 troops on the Ukrainian border. Second, Russia’s yield curve inverted. 

    August 8, 2014

  • Skating over the line

    Narrow rules have a cost. Although there is value in the clarity of rule, process and position, a system must also be flexible. 

    July 29, 2014

  • Language matters

    Just how important is a common language to investing? While some investors view it as the sort of soft, fluffy stuff best left to liberal arts majors, empirically—and in our experience— it is an essential feature of high performing investment teams.

    July 24, 2014

  • The toothbrush test

    A few weeks ago, I was introduced to Google’s Toothbrush Test. Contrary to the images that the name inspires, this test does not involve sticking a web-enabled toothbrush into your mouth to collect data on your molars. Instead, it relates to how Google allocates capital.

    July 11, 2014

  • Look for the baby

    This past week, one of my colleagues shared a learning at our weekly research meeting. Christian and his wife, Siggi, were on vacation when Siggi unfortunately dropped her iPhone into the bath. 

    July 10, 2014

  • Waiting in line: The high cost of red tape

    Imagine you spent 4% of your life waiting in line. Given that there are 8,765 hours in a year, this would imply that you spent 350 hours each year staring at the backs of people’s heads. 

    July 4, 2014

  • The art of survival

    The restaurant industry is tough. Virtually anyone with decent cooking skills and a modest amount of capital can open one; the barriers to entry are quite low. Restaurateurs must also face an unpredictable customer base, as well as significant competition and substitutes.

    June 26, 2014
  • Skating over the line

    Narrow rules have a cost. Although there is value in the clarity of rule, process and position, a system must also be flexible. 

    July 29, 2014

  • Language matters

    Just how important is a common language to investing? While some investors view it as the sort of soft, fluffy stuff best left to liberal arts majors, empirically—and in our experience— it is an essential feature of high performing investment teams.

    July 24, 2014

  • The toothbrush test

    A few weeks ago, I was introduced to Google’s Toothbrush Test. Contrary to the images that the name inspires, this test does not involve sticking a web-enabled toothbrush into your mouth to collect data on your molars. Instead, it relates to how Google allocates capital.

    July 11, 2014

  • Look for the baby

    This past week, one of my colleagues shared a learning at our weekly research meeting. Christian and his wife, Siggi, were on vacation when Siggi unfortunately dropped her iPhone into the bath. 

    July 10, 2014

  • Waiting in line: The high cost of red tape

    Imagine you spent 4% of your life waiting in line. Given that there are 8,765 hours in a year, this would imply that you spent 350 hours each year staring at the backs of people’s heads. 

    July 4, 2014

  • The art of survival

    The restaurant industry is tough. Virtually anyone with decent cooking skills and a modest amount of capital can open one; the barriers to entry are quite low. Restaurateurs must also face an unpredictable customer base, as well as significant competition and substitutes.

    June 26, 2014