The Art of Boring™ was created for curious and passionate investors. We share strategies, frameworks, and insights to help readers and listeners make better investment decisions. Our aim? To provide some bottom-up, long-term investing signal to cut through the short-term noise.

  • (Not) boring finds for September 2015

    Our team comes across hundreds of weird and wonderful reads in our daily research. Below are the handful that stood out for us this month.

    September 29, 2015



  • China’s control issues

    If recent events in China teach us anything, it is that there is a difference between control and resilience. Historically, when governments try this hard to control markets, the control they seek has already been lost.

    September 9, 2015

  • (Not) boring finds for September 2015

    Our team comes across hundreds of weird and wonderful reads in our daily research. Below are the handful that stood out for us this month. Not everything below is technically about investing—but everything relates back to investing or decision-making in some way.

    September 3, 2015

  • Don’t fix a ship in a hurricane

    The middle of a hurricane is not the time to fix your ship. Rather, the best time to fortify your ship is long before you let it sail from harbour.

    August 27, 2015


  • Running with pebbles

    Low-cost lessons are gifts from the gods of probability. Given that many lessons in life are learned through pain, low-cost lessons are opportunities to grow without enduring significant hardship.

    August 13, 2015

  • The expert problem

    A better understanding of how and when to utilize experts helps prevent wasting time and money. 

    August 5, 2015

  • Chinese reform: One step forward, two steps back

    Chinese reform is a big deal. Despite being the second largest economy in the world and experiencing decades of impressive growth, China suffers from structural challenges that hamper its future potential.

    July 30, 2015

  • (Not) boring finds for July 2015

    Our team comes across hundreds of weird and wonderful reads in our daily research. Below are the handful that stood out for us this month.

    July 17, 2015

  • Inflation’s One-Two Punch

    It’s inflation’s second punch that can deliver a blow that investors may not be expecting.

    January 4, 2023


  • Beware the linearity bias

    We tend to think of our world in linear terms, where the output of a system is proportional and directly correlated to its inputs.

    November 2, 2022

  • The quality conundrum

    The conundrum for investors these days is the trade-off between the value of quality and price to pay for it. 

    March 29, 2022



  • Prepare don't predict

    How an engineering principle can improve investment risk management.

    November 3, 2021

  • On modern monetary theory

    We explore the evolution of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) and the notable economic ideas on which it is based. We highlight some notable criticisms and discuss implications of MMT for economic policy and financial markets. Our purpose is less focused on opining whether MMT is fundamentally sound, but rather aimed at understanding its development and how the ground may shift if indeed MMT-based policies are more widely embraced.

    June 30, 2021

  • Where I’m seeing value in emerging markets

    I’ve been revisiting Philip Fisher’s Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits recently. Scanning the opportunity set in emerging markets, I’ve been trying to imagine what Fisher would have made of the current investment landscape.

    May 26, 2021

  • 'Twas the week before Christmas

    ‘Twas the week before Christmas, (and you know it’s true), COVID looms large in our annual review.

    December 18, 2020


  • (Not) boring finds for June 2020

    Howard Marks sent a memo; Ray Dalio explained the last 500 years as they related to empires and reserve currencies; we learned a new word, “shoshin”; and scanned a lot of charts about U.S. advertising revenue trends.

    June 30, 2020

  • The enemy is us: Mitigating confirmation bias

    Back in March, as physical distancing practices were being implemented globally, I was bemused by contrasting provocatively titled articles published within a day of one another. 

    June 10, 2020